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Dramatic new aerial footage over Hawaii's Big Island reveals the extent of devastation caused by the Kilauea volcano, which erupted 34 days ago and shows no signs of easing up. 

"There's a lot of destruction," said Hawaii County Civil Defense administrator Talmadge Magno to CBS affiliate KGMB-TV. "It's like a flood -- it's just pouring out, covering everything in its path. It looks like there's no stopping it."

At least 80 homes were added to the previous count after lava coursed through two newly evacuated subdivisions, pushing the estimated number of buildings overcome by lava close to 200 - putting it on par with the 215 homes destroyed by lava over the last 35 years by the volcano's last eruption cycle which began in 1983. 

"We don't have an estimate yet, but safe to say that hundreds of homes were lost in Kapoho Beach Lots and Vacationland last night," said Janet Snyder, a spokeswoman for Hawaii County on the Big Island.

On Tuesday, lava destroyed Big Island Mayor Harry Kim's vacation home.

"He was very depressed," said County Managing Director Will Okabe, describing how Kim felt about losing his vacation home. Kim and Okabe live in Hilo, the county's seat, which is more than an hour drive from the Kapoho area.

Photo: USGS

Meanwhile, lava filled Kapoho Bay in a matter of days, sending toxic steam mixed with tiny particles of glass billowing into the sky.

"Whenever you have ocean entry, as we call it, we get a tongue of new land," said Tracy Gregg, associate professor of geology and volcano expert at the University at Buffalo. "Sometimes it's stable, but most of the time it's not. Whatever happens, Kapoho will never be a cute little bay again."

Meanwhile in Guatemala...

A second eruption of the Fuego volcano disrupted rescue efforts. At least 75 have been killed in the volcanic explosion that destroyed a nearby village. 

Rescuers cautiously resumed work in the village of San Miguel Los Lotes near the base of the volcano following the second eruption, however rain from the previous night hampered efforts after causing the ash to harden.

Authorities warned that the rain increased the chance of muddy flows of volcanic material and other debris. A red alert remained in place for the departments of Escuintla, Sacatepequez and Chimaltenango, and people were advised not to linger near the affected zones.

Firefighters' spokesperson Julio Sanchez said Tuesday that 72 hours after Sunday's eruption there will be little chance of finding anyone alive. -CBC

"We don't rule out the possibility of some person alive, but the condition in which the homes are makes that possibility pretty unlikely," said Firefighters' spokesman Julio Sanchez, who added that some of the ash was still at temperatures between 750F - 1300F.